Welcome to the Armadale Kelmscott Nuclear Medicine

Armadale Kelmscott Nuclear Medicine is an independently owned nuclear medicine, bone densitometry and specialist practice that is focused on delivering outstanding patient care and clinical service to referrers. Our practice offers bulk billing or low gap fees to patient and further discount to pensioners, health care card holders, children, students as well as for anyone experiencing financial hardship.

Referal Form

What is Nuclear Medicine?

Nuclear Medicine is specialised field focused on function and physiology within the human body. While other imaging modalities such as XRAY/CT/ MRI predominantly focus on the anatomy and structure of organs within the human body. Nuclear medicine uses different radioactive tracers to image each organ. A machine called a Gamma Camera detects the signals sent by the radioactive tracer and converts it into a image for us to analyse. Our Nuclear Medicine Physician then reports on any pathologies we may find. The tests we do in Nuclear Medicine have minimal side effects and the radioactivity which is used has been regulated by the Radiation Council to ensure patient safety. Some of the tests we perform here include, heart scans (incl. viability), lung scans, bone scans, kidney scans, liver scans, gastric scans, thyroid/ parathyroid scans, Cardiac EF, Gall Bladder, MAG 3, HIDA scan, Bone densitometry scans, whole body assessment and ECG without report.

Services

Some of the services we offer.

Heart Imaging

This test assesses the changes to blood supply within your heart during rest and under stress (performed on a treadmill OR with medication). We can also calculate ejection fraction of the left ventricle using 3D data which tells us the ability of the heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. There are a number of reasons for your doctor to request this test such as; a heart attack, investigating shortness of breath, chest pain, heart rhythm irregularities, high risk factors for heart disease, analysing cardiac stents or preoperative risk assessment. Time: Two parts both 2-3 hours approx. Method: Injection into a vein in the arm and 2 scans

Bone Imaging

This test focuses on investigating bone pathologies such as arthritis, fractures, inflammation of the bone, infection of the bone, facet joint arthropathy, bone replacement loosening/infection and bone cancer. Time: Part one 15 mins, part two 1 hour approx. Method: Injection into a vein in the arm and a scan

Lung Imaging

Nuclear Medicine lung scan or V/Q scan, is used to assess the air supply and blood supply within the lungs. Some common symptoms include, shortness of breath or chest pain particularly after extended travel or prolonged hospital stays. This test can demonstrate whether there are any obstructions such as blood clots that might be causing your symptoms. Test time: 1 hour approx. Method: Breathing air through a tube, a injection into a vein in the arm and a scan Normal

Gastric Imaging

Nuclear Medicine Gastric Emptying Scan is considered the gold standard for gastric imaging. Some common indications for this test include diabetes, gastroesophageal reflux and confirmation of gastroparesis in patient's with persistent vomiting and nausea. Time: 3-4 hours approx. Method: Breakfast of 1 egg on toast and a scan (if you have an egg or gluten allergy please contact us)

Thyroid Imaging

The thyroid gland is important in controlling various hormones within the body. Your doctor may order this test to check whether your thyroid gland is over or underactive and if any nodules found on the thyroid are benign or malignant. Test time: 40 minutes approx. Method: Injection into a vein in the arm and a scan

Hepatobilary Imaging

This test can be used to test a number of liver related pathologies, the most common being cholecystitis (gall bladder inflammation). Time: 2 hours approx. Method: Injection into a vein in the arm, drink of flavoured milk and a scan

Renal Imaging

A Renal Scan can be used for visual assessment of renal perfusion and function, to create time/activity curves and quantification of renal function. Common reasons for these scans include, recurrent UTIs, obstructive uropathies and renal transplant evaluation. Time: 1—3 hours approx. Method: Injection into a vein in the arm and a scan

FAQ

Is nuclear medicine and XRAY/CT the same?
Nuclear medicine is used to assess the physiology and function of different organs within the body. XRAY, CT and other imaging modalities predominantly assess the anatomy and structure of organs within the body; these modalities can be less sensitive for physiology.

Is it safe and what are the side effects?
The radioactive tracer used to perform the scans is highly unlikely to cause any harmful side effects. A government regulated quantity of radioactive tracer is used for each test. The camera itself has no harmful effects. The tracer is excreted from the body in 24 hours.

Who performs the test?
All nuclear medicine tests are performed by a Nuclear Medicine Technologist.

How long will it take?
Times vary depending on the test you are having, they range from 20 minutes-4 hours.

What if I’m claustrophobic under the camera?
If you have experienced claustrophobia before please advice us BEFORE your test begins and we can offer arrangements to assist you.

Is there any preparation for the tests?
Some of our tests have certain preparations, our staff will inform you on what you need to do.

What happens with the results?
Results will be ready in approximately one week and a report will be sent to your referring doctor.

Myocardial Perfusion Scan

Nuclear Medicine Heart Test

What is involved and why?

The heart acts like a pump inside the body and requires an adequate blood supply to function well. This test assesses the changes to blood supply within your heart during rest and under stress. There are a number of reasons for your doctor to request this test such as; a heart attack, investigating shortness of breath, chest pain , heart rhythm irregularities, high risk factors for heart disease, analysing cardiac stents or preoperative risk assessment. Myocardial perfusion scan (MPS) is a two-part, non-invasive procedure where a safe amount of radioactive tracer (99mTc-MIBI) is injected into a vein in the arm and a gamma camera is used to scan the heart. The test demonstrates whether your heart muscle is receiving enough blood and also if your heart is pumping adequate blood supply to the rest of your body. The information from these results will assist your doctor in understanding the cause of your symptoms and providing the best course of treatment.

Preparation

  • Part one (rest) usually has no preparation so eat as normal.
  • Fast for 4 hours prior to part two (stress), with the exception of small amounts of water. (If you are having both parts in one day still fast 4 hours before your appointment). Diabetic patients may have a light breakfast 4 hours before stress test.
  • Cease caffeine for 24 hours prior to part two. This includes tea, coffee, chocolate, herbal teas, decaffeinated tea or coffee (these can contain trace amounts of caffeine) and soft drinks.
  • Bring all your medications to both appointments and a list of any allergies you may have. Asthmatic patients please bring your inhaler with you.
  • If you are pregnant please consult your referring doctor prior to making the appointments. If you are breast-feeding please contact our clinic on 08 9390 0001 prior to your appointments.
  • Dress comfortably and wear appropriate shoes as you may be required to do physical exercise. Please avoid dresses and clothing with metal zips and buttons.

Part 1 Rest

  • Meet the technologist and go over paperwork and any questions. There is no preparation for the first part
  • Injection of radioactive tracer into a vein in the arm
  • Wait 30-60 minutes before scan starts
  • Electrodes connected to chest
  • 20 minute scan performed with arms above head using gamma camera (If you have problems putting your arms above your head please let us know)
  • Takes approximately 1.5 hours total

Part 2 Stress

  • Technologist will check your preparation for the second part then place a cannula (plastic tubing) into vein in the arm
  • Electrodes connected to chest and blood pressure cuff placed on arm
  • Baseline ECG and blood pressure reading taken
  • Stress test performed using treadmill or medication, radioactive tracer also injected during stress
  • Wait 30-40 minutes before scan starts
  • 20 minute scan using gamma camera (identical to first scan)
  • Takes approximately 2 hours total

What will be monitored?

  • Heart rate
  • Breathing
  • Blood pressure
  • ECG

What equipment will be used?

  • Treadmill
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG) machine
  • Electrodes
  • Cannula
  • Gamma Camera
  • Blood pressure cuff